Raw or Cooked Vegetables – Which is Healthier?

Raw or Cooked Vegetables

Which is Healthier?

There are so many benefits to raw food diets. But, there are some foods that can actually be more nutritious for us to eat in a cooked form. So how do you know if raw or cooked vegetables are better for you?

It really comes down to nutrition science. Some nutrients are very delicate and degrade quickly when exposed to heat. Others, when cooked, can become easier for our digestive systems to absorb. And then there is the more complex nutrition science of combining specific nutrients to enhance absorption.

The great thing about this time of year is finding the best selection of both raw or cooked vegetables at your local farmers market.

Figuring out whether to go with raw or cooked vegetables can be easy if you understand a bit about nutrition. So here are some really simple points to consider when deciding.

And I’ve included a tasty recipe which combines just the right ingredients to naturally enhance nutrient absorption.

Fruits and Vegetables Best Eaten Raw

As a general rule, fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C and B vitamins are best eaten raw. The reason why is two-fold.

First, these nutrients are very delicate and break down quickly when exposed to heat. Steaming, boiling, roasting, or frying foods rich in Vitamin C and B vitamins will break down the nutrients and make them less beneficial.

The simplest way around this is to eat fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C and B vitamins in their raw form like in a salad. Or, cook them quickly by steaming or blanching. Some examples of these would be any of your leafy greens like lettuces, kale, or spinach along with red peppers and all berries. 

Secondly, foods high in vitamin C and B vitamins are best eaten raw because these nutrients are water soluble.   So, guess where the vitamins go when they’re cooked in water?  They dissolve right into the water. This is particularly true for boiled or poached vegetables. And even steamed vegetables will lose some nutrients in the steam.

Here’s an extra tip for you if you’re going use a water-based method of cooking. Keep that liquid to use in your next soup or sauce to preserve those nutrients left after cooking. But be cautious not to overheat it or you may lose what you were aiming to keep.

Fruits and Vegetables Best Eaten Cooked

Cooking beta-carotene-rich vegetables make this pre-vitamin A compound more absorbable. Orange and red veggies like tomatoes, carrots, & sweet potatoes are most nutritious when they are cooked.  In fact, one study found that absorption of beta-carotene was 6.5 times greater in stir-fried carrots than in raw carrots!

Nutrients in these foods are also considered fat soluble. So for even greater nutrient absorption, eat your fat-soluble vitamins with a bit of fat.

One vegetable that’s best eaten both raw and cooked – Spinach!

Spinach contains so many beneficial compounds that its great eaten both raw and cooked.

Eating raw spinach preserves the water-soluble vitamins C and B vitamins. Raw spinach can contain three times the amount of vitamin C as cooked spinach.

Eating spinach cooked allows the pre-vitamin A, as well as some of the minerals like iron to be better absorbed. And it’s easier to eat a larger serving of cooked spinach because cooked spinach reduces in size, so you can consume more nutrition without feeling stuffed.

As you can see by the spinach example, knowing if either raw or cooked vegetables are more nutritious can depend on the vegetable itself.

Here’s a great spinach recipe for you that also incorporates the idea of combining nutrients to enhance absorption. Spinach is rich in the essential mineral iron. The lemon in this recipe is high in vitamin C. Vitamin C enhances the absorption of iron when consumed together. Enjoy!

Sautéed Spinach

Serves 4

2 teaspoons olive oil

2 cloves garlic

1 bag baby spinach leaves

 dash of salt

 dash of black pepper

1 Fresh lemon

In a large cast iron pan heat olive oil.  Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute.  Add spinach, salt, pepper and toss with garlic and oil.  Cover pan and cook on low for about 2 minutes.   Sauté spinach for another minute, stirring frequently, until all the spinach is wilted. Remove from heat and squeeze fresh lemon juice on top. Serve & enjoy!

Click Here to view the recipe as PDF or to print/save a copy of this recipe.

About Sharon  

As a Certified Holistic Health Coach, I’ve taken more than twenty-five years of client work and personal life experience to create a proven system to help you live the vibrant healthy life you desire. 

If you struggle with weight, low energy or nagging health issues.   

I want you to know…It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way.   

I invite you to join me for a FREE one hour “It’s All About YOU!” call. 
Together we will…
  1. Clarify your vision for a healthier, thinner, and happier you!
  2. Identify what has gotten in your way in the past (it’s not always what you think)
  3. Map out the next right steps for you to live the vibrant healthy life you so desire. 
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Posted in Dieting, Healthy Eating, Healthy Lifestyle, Nutrition, Recipes

Keep Those Veggies Fresher Longer

Keep Those Veggies Fresher Longer

It’s no secret that I am a farmers’ market fan. For one thing, you just can’t beat the convenience of having all those fresh fruits and veggies all in one place. But, I overdo it sometimes.  I can get carried away and come home with enough food to feed us and the neighbors. This can create a challenge to keep those veggies fresher longer. 

As they say, necessity is the mother of invention. I certainly didn’t invent food storage. But, through my own necessity, I’ve come up with what I think are some really great strategies to keep those veggies fresher longer. And as a side beneift these strategies make healthy eating a breeze. 

The struggle to keep those veggies fresher longer is real. Some say it keeps them away from farmers markets. I get that. Tossing away spoiled produce is a real waste of money.

So, in this blog, I’m going to share with you some really quick and simple ways to keep those veggies fresher longer. 

For me, it’s all about getting it done quickly.  Also, I try and keep in mind prepping ahead for the busy work week.  No time to be cleaning and prepping veggies after work when we’re trying to get dinner on the table.

It’s also a healthier habit to have everything cleaned and prepped ahead of time. Think about it. When you’re hungry and looking for something to eat, what do you go for first? The quickest most convenient thing you can get your hands on, right? Why not make sure that it is something healthy?

This is why I carve out time either right when I get home from the market or first thing on Saturday morning. I clean, wash and prep everything I can before it goes into the fridge.

Here’s how I Keep Those Veggies Fresher Longer

First, you’ll need some supplies; a washing basin, white vinegar, salad spinner, paper towels, and the secret weapon, Debbie Meyer Green Bags. These bags are made with a natural mineral that helps to keep produce from spoiling. They are amazing and can keep produce fresh for up to two weeks. You can find them online or at local stores.  

Leafy greens

Leafy greens like lettuces, kale, spinach, and chard get a white vinegar and cold water bath. These greens tend to grow in sandy soil and you’ll need to cut the ends off and submerge them in a basin full of water to get the sand out of them. Rinse until the water is clean and run them through the salad spinner.

Separate into meal size servings and wrap in a clean paper towel. This allows you to grab only what you need for one meal when you’re short on time.  You can store the separately wrapped servings all together in the same bag and keep them in the fridge.

Berries

Berries can spoil quickly. Remove them immediately from the container or bag you bought them in. Wash them in a cold water vinegar bath and rinse well. Make sure they are completely dry before you store them to prevent mold.  Bigger berries like strawberries you can lay out on baking racks. Smaller berries like blueberries spread out on a paper towel until they are dry.

There are conflicting opinions on storing berries in the fridge. Some say yes, some say no. I keep some in the fridge and some in a bowl on the counter based on how long it will be before we use them. But here’s the thing, in our house the ones that are out on the counter go a lot quicker and are less likely to be forgotten about. Berries are a healthy grab-n-go snack and are a much better choice than chips or junk food so make them readily available.

Vegetables & Potatoes

Vegetables like peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, and potatoes get cleaned right away too. Another cold water bath with vinegar, dry thoroughly, and into a green bag before storing in the fridge. Keep the onions and potatoes out of the fridge. They should be stored in a cool, dark, dry place, but not together. Onions and potatoes each give off gasses that cause the other to spoil faster.

Fruits

You’ll want to do the same with fruits like peaches, plums, nectarines, apples, and pears. Wash in a cold water and vinegar bath, rinse with clean water, dry completely, and store. Often I will leave these fruits out in a fruit bowl for a quick grab-n-go snack. But, if you’re family doesn’t eat them quickly like we do, store in a green bag and keep in the fridge. But remember, just like the berries, if you keep these fruits visible and ready to go, they’ll be the snack of choice instead of candy or chips.

As you can see this post is about more than simply keeping those veggies fresher longer. It’s really about making it easy and convenient for you and your family to have healthy food choices at the ready. The more healthy habits like this you can adopt, the easier it is to maintain good health.

Here’s a cool and healthy summer recipe that uses some of your farmers market goodies.

Cold Cucumber & Spinach Soup

¼ cup lemon juice

1 or 2 cloves of garlic

2 cups packed spinach

6 cups cucumber

1 small avocado, pit removed

radish, sliced then cut into matchsticks for garnish

2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh dill

fresh parsley

In a blender, combine lemon juice and spinach. Pulse to combine. Add cucumber and puree until smooth. Scoop avocado into the blender and continue to puree until mixture is very smooth. Season with salt to taste. Chill. Serve with dill, radish, and parsley as a garnish.

Click Here to view the recipe as PDF or to print/save a copy of this recipe.

About Sharon  

As a Certified Holistic Health Coach, I’ve taken more than twenty-five years of client work and personal life experience to create a proven system to help you live the vibrant healthy life you desire. 

If you struggle with weight, low energy or nagging health issues.   

I want you to know…It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way.   

I invite you to join me for a FREE one hour “It’s All About YOU!” call. 
Together we will…
  1. Clarify your vision for a healthier, thinner, and happier you!
  2. Identify what has gotten in your way in the past (it’s not always what you think)
  3. Map out the next right steps for you to live the vibrant healthy life you so desire. 
Like what you see? Want more?

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Posted in Dieting, Healthy Eating, Healthy Lifestyle, Nutrition, Recipes

Five Health Benefits of Berries

Five Health Benefits of Berries

Strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, boysenberries, cherries, and cranberries are just some of the wonderful berries that come into season this time of the year. And there are so many ways for you to enjoy the health benefits of berries. Most are delish on their own and make a wonderfully healthy snack or top with a dollop of whip cream for a light summer dessert.

Berries are naturally low in calories, fat, and sugar so they complement any eating style. Adding a few servings of berries into your daily diet is a great way to get some added nutrition with very few calories.

All berries are not a created equal. The health benefits of berries can be unique to the type of berry, however, all berries do share a few common health benefits. They are little powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, flavonoids, and fiber. Let’s take a look and see just how good for you they are.

Disease Fighting

Berries are chock full of powerful cancer-fighting antioxidants like anthocyanins, ellagic acid, and resveratrol.  These antioxidants help to keep cancer-causing free radicals under control while reducing oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation is believed to be at the root of all disease. So eat those berries!

Regulate Blood Sugar

If you are looking to control blood sugar, there is no better whole food than berries. Berries are naturally low in sugar and are packed with blood sugar stabilizing fiber that burns slower and requires less of an insulin response. Studies have also shown that blueberries improve insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant patients.

Fills You Up

Fiber keeps you fuller, longer. Pound for pound, berries are a great source of fiber. Adding fiber-rich foods like berries to your diet is very helpful for natural appetite control because you stay satisfied longer.  And, fiber has been shown to benefit both heart and digestive health.

Boost Vitamin Intake

Berries are a nutrient-dense food which means you get more nutrition contained in fewer calories. This is the exact opposite of the way most of us eat choosing high-calorie foods with little or no nutritional value. Berries give you so many choices for good nutrition. For example, one cup of strawberries gives you an entire day’s supply of vitamin C.

Lower Cholesterol

Studies have shown that people who consume berries daily can experience significant reductions in LDL (bad cholesterol). Berries also help to keep LDL from becoming oxidized which is believed to be a major risk factor for heart disease. And the high fiber content of berries helps to “brush” cholesterol from the digestive tract before it can be absorbed.

There are so many more health benefits of berries, far more than I can mention here. So, be sure to look for a variety of berries at your local farmers’ markets and farm stands during the coming weeks. Many varieties of berries will be coming into season throughout the summer.

Here’s a great gluten-free recipe for fresh blueberries. You’d have a hard time finding a muffin recipe with more protein and fiber that is naturally low glycemic.

Blueberry Oatmeal Muffins

2 cups raw rolled oats – ground in blender or food processor
2 tsp cinnamon
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp vanilla
1 tsp maple syrup
1 tsp fructose or stevia
3 eggs
9 egg whites
¾ cup blueberries

Combine eggs, cinnamon, baking powder, vanilla, maple flavoring, fructose or stevia, and eggs. Add ground oats and blueberries. Divide batter into 6 lightly greased muffins, using large muffin tins. No muffin papers. Bake 29 minutes in a preheated 350° oven.

Click Here to view the recipe as PDF or to print/save a copy of this recipe.

About Sharon  

As a Certified Holistic Health Coach, I’ve taken more than twenty-five years of client work and personal life experience to create a proven system to help you live the vibrant healthy life you desire. 

If you struggle with weight, low energy or nagging health issues.   

I want you to know…It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way.   

I invite you to join me for a FREE one hour “It’s All About YOU!” call. 
Together we will…
  1. Clarify your vision for a healthier, thinner, and happier you!
  2. Identify what has gotten in your way in the past (it’s not always what you think)
  3. Map out the next right steps for you to live the vibrant healthy life you so desire. 
Like what you see? Want more?

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Posted in Dieting, Healthy Eating, Healthy Lifestyle, Nutrition, Recipes, Vitalized Wellness News

Is Dairy Bad For You?

Is Dairy Bad For You?

Last week I talked to you about gut health. (click here if you missed it) One of the tips I gave you was to remove certain foods or food groups for a period of time to see if you feel better without them. Diary is typically one of the most common gut irritants and one of the first foods I recommend be eliminated. But, Is Dairy Bad For YOU? 

Dairy intolerance is tricky and can manifest in different ways. This is because there are several problematic ingredients in dairy products that can produce different types of reactions in different people. Some of the more obvious symptoms are abdominal pain, discomfort, and nausea. It also causes embarrassing symptoms like flatulence and diarrhea.

Other symptoms linked to dairy or other food intolerances can include muscle or joint pain, headaches, exhaustion, and even skin symptoms like rashes and eczema. And then there are others which are specific to a dairy allergy or intolerance that I’ll get into a little later in this post.

I’m going to break it down for you by pointing out some of the problematic ingredients in dairy along with the common symptoms each may cause. You can determine for yourself – Is Dairy Bad For YOU?

But first I’ll share a tip with you. Eliminating dairy from your diet may help you to see your symptoms better. You may be so accustomed to your symptoms that you don’t even notice them anymore, or attribute them to another cause. I see this often with clients. It’s only after being off dairy for a couple of weeks and then reintroducing it that you will clearly see how your body responds.

Is Dairy Bad For YOU? – You Decide

Dairy Intolerance – Milk sugar – Lactose

It’s estimated that up to 75% of adults are lactose intolerant. Lactose is the milk sugar naturally found in most dairy products. Lactose intolerance is so common you can buy lactose-free milk in your regular grocery store. You know, those silly talking cow commercials? 

Lactose-free products are treated with the enzyme “lactase” that breaks down the lactose before you ingest it. It’s this lactase enzyme that is lacking in most people who are lactose intolerant.

When someone doesn’t have enough lactase enzyme undigested lactose ends up being food for the resident gut microbes that I spoke to you about last week. As the microbes break down the lactose, it creates gases that cause bloating, flatulence, pain, and sometimes diarrhea.

Fermented dairy like cheese and yogurt have less lactose. So does butter.

You must be a diligent label reader to avoid an accidental dose of lactose.  Dairy is added to other foods like baked goods, soups, and sauces. And watch your medications or supplements as lactose is a common ingredient in there too. 

Dairy Allergy – Milk protein- Casein & Whey

Remeber Little Miss Muffet eating her curds and whey? She likely didn’t have a dairy allergy. These are the two main proteins in milk. The solid bits are the curds made of casein, and the liquid is the dissolved whey.

Unlike lactose intolerance, casein and whey can cause an actual immune response which is considered an allergy. And this immune response can cause inflammation.

Like lactose, these allergenic milk proteins can be found in other products too. They’re not just in dairy but are often in protein powders as well. Whey based protein powders are very common. 

Some of the symptoms of a milk protein allergy differ from that of lactose intolerance; things like nasal congestion and mucus (phlegm) are more common here. This is what happens to me when I eat dairy. I get a stuffy nose and phlegm in my throat. And, if I eat enough of it, my ears will fill with fluid. This is why children with chronic ear infections and other respiratory issues should be taken off of all dairy products.

Interestingly, people who have gluten intolerance are often allergic to milk proteins like whey and casein as well. These can go hand-in-hand. I can vouch for that too! Along with a dairy intolerance I am gluten sensitive.  But, I can also tell you from years of experience, that it’s not the end of the world. I eat tons of delicious foods and have no problem getting all the calcium and other nutrients my body needs without dairy and wheat.

Like lactose intolerance, if you’re allergic to casein and whey keep an eye on labels so you can avoid these too. I’ve been living gluten and dairy free for many years.  If you need some help figuring all this out let me know in the comments below or drop me an email.

Summing it all up…

If you get gassy, bloated, or diarrhea after eating dairy, you may have a lactose intolerance. If you often get a stuffy nose and mucus, then you may be allergic to casein and/or whey. These symptoms should help you answer the question – Is Dairy Bad For YOU?

Here’s the thing, dairy is not essential to a healthy diet. All the nutrients in dairy are available in other foods that are often easier to digest.  If you experience any undesirable symptoms when you eat dairy, don’t eat dairy. You may find improved digestion and fewer gut issues. Or you may find you have less nasal congestion, or even less belly fat.

If you decide to or have already removed dairy from your diet, let me know your experience in the comments below.

Here’s a yummy dairy-free summer treat!

Dairy Free Chocolate Ice “Cream”

Serves 2

3 bananas, sliced and frozen
2 tsp cacao powder, unsweetened
1 tbsp almond butter

Instructions:

Place frozen bananas in food processor and blend until smooth (a few minutes). You may have to stop a few times to scrape the sides.

Add cacao powder and almond butter and blend until mixed well.

Serve & enjoy!

Tip: You can make this in advance and freeze in an airtight container.

Click Here to view the recipe as PDF or to print/save a copy of this recipe.

About Sharon  

As a Certified Holistic Health Coach, I’ve taken more than twenty-five years of client work and personal life experience to create a proven system to help you live the vibrant healthy life you desire. 

If you struggle with weight, low energy or nagging health issues.   

I want you to know…It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way.   

I invite you to join me for a FREE one hour “It’s All About YOU!” call. 
Together we will…
  1. Clarify your vision for a healthier, thinner, and happier you!
  2. Identify what has gotten in your way in the past (it’s not always what you think)
  3. Map out the next right steps for you to live the vibrant healthy life you so desire. 
Like what you see? Want more?

Sign Up Now

Have weekly blogs delivered right to your inbox.  
Posted in Dieting, Healthy Eating, Healthy Lifestyle, Nutrition, Recipes, Vitalized Wellness News

Five Simple Ways To Improve Gut Health

Five Simple Ways To Improve Gut Health

Hippocrates said, “All disease begins in the gut.”

While this may not be 100% true for every disease in every person, more and more research shows that our gut, or digestive system, has a bigger role in many diseases than we used to think.

There are a few reasons for this. One of which is that it’s here where disease-causing bacteria, viruses, parasites, and toxins can be absorbed and spread to other body systems. And probably the most important link to overall health is that more than 70% of immune system cells reside in our guts. 

We also take in nutrients through our gut. The nutrients we ingest and absorb are the building blocks of every single part of our body. An unhealthy gut has compromised absorption of nutrients

We’re just learning the connections between our gut and other areas of our body, like our brain.  It’s not only gut; but, its friendly resident microbes too. These guys also have newly discovered roles in our gut health and overall health and help to keep our gut ecology in balance.

Regular bouts of heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, IBS, or IBD can be signs that you’re gut ecology is out of whack. Heed these early warning signs. A prolonged imbalance of gut ecology can lead to allergies, pain, inflammation, mood disorders, cognitive decline, nutrient deficiencies and possibly disease.

So, let’s talk about the roles that our gut and our gut microbes play in our overall health. Then I’ll give you tips to improve gut health naturally.

Our gut’s role in our overall health

Our gut’s main role is as a barrier. To let things in that should get in, and to keep things out that should stay out. Think of “absorption” of nutrients as things we want to let in; and “elimination” of waste as things we want to pass right through and out.

This seemingly simple role is super-complex! And it can break down in so many places.

For one thing, our guts can “leak.” Yes, like a long tube with holes in it. It can allow things to get into our bloodstream/bodies that can wreak havoc, like bacteria, undigested food, and toxins. You name it, whatever you put into your mouth can be absorbed by your gut and get into your bloodstream, even if it’s not supposed to. And when your gut wall gets irritated, it can “leak.” When this happens, you get inflammation, which is a starting point for many diseases that don’t seem linked to the gut but have a sneaky connection there.

A healthy gut is not a leaky gut. It maintains its barrier and shuttles things through to be eliminated. Maintaining a healthy gut barrier is the first way to improve gut health.

The second main part of your gut are the billions of friendly health-promoting microbes. Gut microbes help us digest and absorb nutrients. They fight off disease-causing microbes, aid in nutrient absorption,  make some vitamins for us, and have all kinds of other health benefits, like mental health benefits, reducing inflammation, and stabilizing blood sugar.

So, keeping your gut microbes in good shape is another way to improve gut health

Five Simple Ways To Improve Gut Health

1- What to eliminate

It’s always best to eliminate the cause, so let’s stop giving our guts junk to deal with. How about eliminating added sugars, processed foods, and alcohol? Dairy and grains contain common compounds known to irritate some people’s guts too. Sometimes you only need to eliminate them for a few weeks to see if it makes a difference for you.

2- What to add in

By eating nutrient-dense foods, we allow ample macro-and micro-nutrients into our gut to maximize the chance for absorption. These nutrients help our bodies build and repair our gut, and every other body part as well. Some of the most nutrient-dense foods include dark leafy greens, colorful fruits and veggies, liver, and fish.

3- What to get more of

You can’t improve gut health without adding in healthy microbes. By ingesting probiotic-rich foods and drinks, we can help to replenish our gut microbes. These are found in fermented foods like kombucha, kefir, miso, sauerkraut, and kimchi. Taking a high-quality, pre and probiotic supplement helps too. Click Here to see the one I recommend and use myself. Make these a part of your daily diet.

4- Fiber, fiber, and more fiber

Whole foods are full of gut-friendly fiber. Not eating enough fiber increases the risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Fiber plays lots of roles in our gut, including whisking away some of those pesky bad bacteria and toxins so they can be eliminated. Fiber also helps to feed the friendly resident microbes that help us absorb and digest our food better. What foods have a lot of fiber? Fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and even cacao.

5- Lifestyle

And don’t forget the oh so important lifestyle factors like getting enough sleep, stressing less, and getting the right amount of exercise for you. It’s easy to forget some of the simple, but key links there are between what we do with our bodies and how well they function.

Summing it all up…

A healthy, well functioning gut is key to your overall health. The two most important areas to pay attention to are maintaining a good barrier and maintaining healthy gut microbes.

The main ways to improve both of these naturally is by eating nutrient-dense whole foods. Foods filled with nutrition, probiotics, and fiber. And eliminating common gut irritants like added sugar, processed foods, and alcohol.

The recipe below is a great way to replenish and restore good gut microbes. 

Fermented Carrots

Serves 12

1 qt warm water
4 tsp salt
4 carrots, medium, peeled, sliced

1 clove garlic, smashed (optional)

Make a brine by dissolving the salt in water.

Place carrots into a clean canning jar, packing them in tight. Make sure to leave about 1 inch of headspace at the top.

Fill the jar with brine, making sure to cover the carrots completely. Weigh the carrots down to make sure they don’t float (you can use a “fermenting weight”).

Close the jar and let it sit at room temperature for 1-4 days. The longer it sits, the more the flavor will develop. Feel free to open and taste.

Serve & enjoy!

Tip: Use this as a side dish, or even a snack.

Click Here to view the recipe as PDF or to print/save a copy of this recipe.

About Sharon  

As a Certified Holistic Health Coach, I’ve taken more than twenty-five years of client work and personal life experience to create a proven system to help you live the vibrant healthy life you desire. 

If you struggle with weight, low energy or nagging health issues.   

I want you to know…It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way.   

I invite you to join me for a FREE one hour “It’s All About YOU!” call. 
Together we will…
  1. Clarify your vision for a healthier, thinner, and happier you!
  2. Identify what has gotten in your way in the past (it’s not always what you think)
  3. Map out the next right steps for you to live the vibrant healthy life you so desire. 
Like what you see? Want more?

Sign Up Now

Have weekly blogs delivered right to your inbox.  
Posted in Dieting, Healthy Eating, Healthy Lifestyle, Nutrition, Recipes, Vitalized Wellness News

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